mushroom, pepper and olive sauce

I’m sharing today’s lunch recipe, I hope you try it, enjoy it and let me know what you think!

The main ingredients…

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Made 2 servings of sauce, with brown rice

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Ingredients list and how-to…

1 50 gramme pack portobello mushrooms
1 red pepper
1 jar olive tomato sauce
2 tbsp vegetable oil
1 tbsp engevita nutritional yeast flakes
2 tbsp oatly cream

heat the oil in a large pan
chop the mushrooms and add to the pan, stirring and then put the lid on the pan, turn down the heat to low.
Add a chopped red pepper, seeds and white part removed (the white part is bitter)
continue to cook until the peppers and mushrooms are soft
Add the jar of sauce, cook for a further half hour, then add the oatly cream and engevita.
Serve with rice or pasta.
This is a very easy recipe which allows you to get some nutritious mushrooms and plenty of veg.

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Can you save Planet Earth by yourself?

Governments could do more to help protect The Only Planet… but governments need profitable economies.
For example Governments could outright ban plastic packaging… but this would negatively affect the economy, and may be unpopular.
Where major legislation has been implemented it has been successful.
for example
Clean Air
Cigarette Smoking
Landfill Tax

We could believe that legislation changes which drive individuals to change their behaviour are much more effective than the efforts of individuals alone to change their own behaviour.
To be honest I totally agree with this suggestion.

Thinking of the problems I wrote about ocean pollution…
there are some laws relating to protection of the UK coastal waters
but with no funding for the policing of these laws, they are weak.
In Europe and the developed world we may think that the environmental problems are not really there, but where there are affluent post industrial societies reaping the economic benefit of their industrial past, we will have exported the environmental problem to Asia, Africa and some parts of America, and Africa, where mining and heavy industry are prevalent.

Photo Courtesy of Newcastle Libraries Flickr

Equality News Update: Suicide epidemic must be tackled by new government — Fife Centre for Equalities

Mental health charity Samaritans is calling on the government to make suicide prevention a top priority and to deliver on election promises.

via Equality News Update: Suicide epidemic must be tackled by new government — Fife Centre for Equalities

Being driven is not always a good thing — Mindfulbalance

On the day after being nominated among the 50 best blogs “on the planet”, these thoughts on striving and becoming which I had written for today seem even more apt… One reason we practice mindfulness meditation is to strengthen our capacity to “be with” what is here, rather than always nurturing the deep-seated dynamic of…

via Being driven is not always a good thing — Mindfulbalance

Castle Leazes and Ricky Road Flats

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Richardson Road Flats construction and Castle Leazes Moor
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Richardson Road Flats construction

I had an appointment at the Royal Victoria Infirmary this morning and I could not resist these photos of the new Richardson Road student flats, which as you can see are very near completion.
On the right the trees of Leazes Park, with the footpath which borders it.

More on clothes, Primark, and textile recycling

I went into Primark later to look for a fringed scarf.
I do like scarves, they allow a dull dresser like myself whose main fashion influence was Andy Warhol (he said he always wore black because then he wouldn’t have to decide what to wear with what) to look smarter.
Scarves can be matched with an outfit to brighten it up, they have many other uses, keeping you warm when its cold, in winter substitute scarves for wooly hats and you will look much more glamorous.
In summer wear them draped keeping the sun off, which is handy for people like me with Lupus who are advised to stay out of the sun.
They can be a headscarf worn in many different ways, or even a blackout curtain for putting over your eyes which is what I do when I’m staying somewhere which hasn’t got thick curtains in the summer!

Primark: I went in via the main entrance on Northumberland Street. That is a very very big shop.
I needed to be on the first floor for scarves.
By the time I had been in the shop a few minutes I decided to leave. Too many clothes, too little time…
There is a Primark scarf I have had a few years which is in good condition, similar to this one

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However most of the products do not have a long life, either due to flimsy quality or being so very on-trend, and there are not enough clothing recycling bins for it all. This is an extremely popular shop and it was very full of customers, looking to buy. Textiles, how many many tonnes of it!

There is a problem with the fashion industry if it encourages this disposable attitude to clothes. The sheer volume of textiles generated is unsustainable. We do recycle, we do pass on, we do give clothes to charities, but even the charities are finding it hard to cope with the quantity of low grade clothing and disposable textiles.
Today I’m emptying the wardrobe and drawers in my bedroom as a couple of friends are helping me move my bedroom furniture, as I’m planning on getting a new carpet.
I didn’t realise how much stuff I have got. Its too much. How many long sleeved black tops do I actually need?
When I put it all back I’ll see if anything can be purged.

Textile Recycling

I went to the clothing bank by the Nuns Moor Centre on Studley Terrace.

I could put clothes and shoes in the British Heart Foundation Bank and support
research into heart disease, and subsidise animal experiments.

If I have been affected by heart disease, I may feel the British Heart Foundation is justified in funding experiments on animals.

Alternatively I could put sheets, towels, clothes and shoes in the Islamic Relief bank and support

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2 banks, neither very large.

In fact Newcastle and other councils in the North east are doing a lot of recycling at the reclamation yards, aka The Incinerator, The Tip, The Dump, due to the UK Government Landfill Tax, which places punitive tax on councils sending waste to landfill.
Non contaminated textiles are recycled as wadding, used in insulation or sent to Scandinavia to be burned for fuel. But it doesn’t go far enough, as I will explain soon.