More on clothes, Primark, and textile recycling

I went into Primark later to look for a fringed scarf.
I do like scarves, they allow a dull dresser like myself whose main fashion influence was Andy Warhol (he said he always wore black because then he wouldn’t have to decide what to wear with what) to look smarter.
Scarves can be matched with an outfit to brighten it up, they have many other uses, keeping you warm when its cold, in winter substitute scarves for wooly hats and you will look much more glamorous.
In summer wear them draped keeping the sun off, which is handy for people like me with Lupus who are advised to stay out of the sun.
They can be a headscarf worn in many different ways, or even a blackout curtain for putting over your eyes which is what I do when I’m staying somewhere which hasn’t got thick curtains in the summer!

Primark: I went in via the main entrance on Northumberland Street. That is a very very big shop.
I needed to be on the first floor for scarves.
By the time I had been in the shop a few minutes I decided to leave. Too many clothes, too little time…
There is a Primark scarf I have had a few years which is in good condition, similar to this one

mAcyrmRALPKyQa2TjV_GWyA.jpg

However most of the products do not have a long life, either due to flimsy quality or being so very on-trend, and there are not enough clothing recycling bins for it all. This is an extremely popular shop and it was very full of customers, looking to buy. Textiles, how many many tonnes of it!

There is a problem with the fashion industry if it encourages this disposable attitude to clothes. The sheer volume of textiles generated is unsustainable. We do recycle, we do pass on, we do give clothes to charities, but even the charities are finding it hard to cope with the quantity of low grade clothing and disposable textiles.
Today I’m emptying the wardrobe and drawers in my bedroom as a couple of friends are helping me move my bedroom furniture, as I’m planning on getting a new carpet.
I didn’t realise how much stuff I have got. Its too much. How many long sleeved black tops do I actually need?
When I put it all back I’ll see if anything can be purged.

Advertisements

Plastic Pollution

I found this post in my draft folder. I wrote it a while ago and maybe  for some reason didn’t want to publish it at the time. So apologies if it seems a bit out of date.

The has been some news recently about the harmful effects of plastic fleece. The kind that clothing is made from. Fleece jackets and so on. Also microfibre cloth. I remember when fleece  clothing was thought of as being an environmental “good” because it was  a way of recycling used plastic bottles. But apparently when plastic fleece, and microfibre clothes are washed, fibres get washed away and end up polluting the ocean. I also remember having a few viscose jumpers which basically rotted away after being washed a few times, I did not think that the fibres would have ended up polluting the ocean.
Over the last few years companies in Europe have been improving the way products are packaged, and there is  less packaging than at the packaging peak, however there is still a long way to go.